Where Do Nucleotides Come From?

Where Do Nucleotides Come From?

Dietary nucleotides, as their name implies, come from our diets. These are termed exogenous since they are created external to our body from various food sources. Our body can also create nucleotides. These are referred to as endogenous since they are created within. The creation of new nucleotides is referred to as de novo synthesis. For dietary sources of nucleotides, please refer to the following chart.

Dietary Sources of Nucleotides – (milligrams/100 grams)

Source Adenine Guanine Total Purines RNA

Beef liver 62 74 197 268
Beef kidney 42 47 213 134
Beef heart 15 16 171 49
Beef brain 12 12 162 61
Pork liver 59 77 289 259
Chicken liver 72 78 243 402
Chicken heart 32 41 223 187
Fresh seafood 8 185 411 341
Clams 14 24 136 85
Mackerel 11 26 194 203
Salmon 26 80 250 289
Sardines 6 118 245 243
Squid 18 15 135 100
Dried legumes 17 14 56 356
Split peas 88 74 195 173
Lentils 54 51 162 140
Blackeye peas 104 82 222 306
Pinto beans 46 39 144 485

Nucleotides are some of the largest molecules synthesized by our cells, and their creation requires many substrates, many steps and huge amounts of energy. They biosynthesis of nucleotides is under very tight control since energy is wasted when making too much, and DNA replication and cellular metabolism is slowed down when making too little. Our cells are also very sensitive to the amount of free nucleotides floating within the nucleus or the cytoplasm. The cell will always choose to use the nucleotides that have already been created before synthesizing new ones. Cellular energy is conserved and DNA replication is enhanced by making sure that your cells are constantly supplied with exogenous nucleotides.

Where Do Nucleotides Come From